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Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Bob Woodward’s New Book: All The President’s Deceits

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Jared Kushner said the key to understanding Trump is the Cheshire Cat in Alice in Wonderland who famously said, "If you don't know where you're going, any path will take you there." Kushner describes his father-in-law variously as "crazy, unpredictable, stubborn and manipulative."

Unsettled Ground: The Whitman Massacre and its Shifting Legacy

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The Cayuse were openly social, giving gifts and moving freely among each other’s lodges. The Whitmans built fences, locked their doors, and had no gifts to give. The missionaries, had a rigid belief system; the Cayuse, Tate writes, “were religious synthesizers willing to graft new ideas onto old beliefs.”

Book Review: The Apocalypse Factory

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The 560-square mile Hanford Reservation manufactured plutonium for nuclear weapons for more than four decades. Its mishaps, and cleanup of the nation’s largest concentration of high-level nuclear waste, have been a major Northwest news story for 40 years.

Mindy Cameron’s New Book: Struggles in a Newsroom

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As a newsie myself, I appreciated her early struggles at the Times where she worked in a male-dominated atmosphere and answered to at least one unsympathetic editor.

Vitamin W: Health Benefits Of that Nightly Glass of Wine

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Research conducted by Serge Renaud of the University of Bordeaux discovered that although the French smoke and eat more dietary fat than Americans, they suffer half the mortality rate from coronary disease. Renaud argued that the French’s regular red wine consumption accounted for the difference.

Reading: The Plague During Plague

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This spring I decided to take a zoomed book class offered by Alliance Française Seattle. The assigned...

How to fight racism and anti-black violence? Another reading list

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Books may not have the answers we seek to confronting and understanding racism and anti-black violence. But maybe they can help.

What Can Existentialism Teach Us About Today?

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All of the Existentialists are philosophers of life who refuse to spin systems of ideals, insisting instead, like the American Pragmatists, that philosophies are only truly tested in lived experience.

Ten Books To Read in the Pandemic

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Looking for insights on our current circumstances from other times and writers? Here is a basket full of books that speak to our time from the past.

Rebecca Solnit’s Book: Remaking Our Lives Amid Major Disasters

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Disasters are “extraordinarily generative,” Solnit contends. From them emerge new ways of seeing the world and one another. Fruitless preoccupations suddenly fade away. Hitherto un-imagined possibilities emerge.

A Plague Reader – From Florence to Seattle

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The onset and turbulent passage of Seattle’ influenza epidemic matches our present experience, and its history may serve as a route-guide. The "Spanish" Flu orphaned Emmett Watson and Mary McCarthy who, arguably, became writers as a result.

Nation Divided: Of Social Distancing And Polarization

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Here’s my question. Have we not been demanding social distancing, admittedly of a different type, for some time now? Another word for “social distancing” is “polarization.”

Books: International Intrigue – A Handful of Current Thrillers

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The Names of the Dead Kevin Wignall  Abandoned by his CIA colleagues when...

Books: The Forgotten, Shameful Story of the Chinese Who Built the Western Railways

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They laid rail in blistering desert heat and spent brutal winters digging and blasting tunnels in the treacherous Sierra Nevada Mountains. And they were segregated, mocked, beaten, robbed, and murdered.

What & How – The Twin Towers of History

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History is an agonizingly difficult study. It is not a science, and as an art it is risky business.

The Mystery Behind The Mystery Writer: Michael Gruber’s Long Con

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It says something about the state of publishing today that Gruber couldn't find a buyer for this book - it's an almost perfect example of a caper novel, more light-hearted than some of his earlier thrillers but just as erudite, well-plotted and entertaining as his previous books.

Evangelical Churches Create Celebrities, While Mainliners Get Shy. Why?

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"We cannot imagine being proud to see one of our mainline authors, from our subculture, on the shelf at Walmart. In many ways, our objections to celebrity are a veiled way of talking about class.”

Architecture and The Unlamented End of ‘Modernism’

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"Making Dystopia" makes me wonder if Modernism -- the word itself is a marvel of marketing -- may be about to fade from favor and be "deconstructed" like so many other imposed-from-above cultural values.

Books: Sound Transit’s Arduous Trek to Building Rail Transit

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Approving a fixed-rail rapid transit for a city is one of the most contentious decisions that an urban populace can make. In Seattle, rail proposals were defeated at the election polls in 1968, 1970, and 1995. And it was still difficult after that.

Books: A New Crime Blogger In Town

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You can practically smell the salty tang in the air and taste the coffee in one of the author's favorite cafes. It's a promising debut.

Why Do Christian Evangelicals Support Trump And Not Buttigieg?

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"If mainstream media figures believe that Mayor Pete speaks the same Christian language as Trump’s Evangelical base, they need to think again. He’s a sincere proponent of a faith that is very different from theirs.”

Books: A Seattle Historian on How the West Rescued a Starving Russia

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I was shocked by this story — it was so dramatic, moving, powerful, and historically important — yet few Americans, and even fewer Russians know about it.

Books: David Guterson’s “Turn Around Time” – Nature’s Call To Arms

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"Turn around time is an alpinist’s notion – that preplanned moment when, no matter what, it’s time to reverse course and head back. The principle acknowledges an unstoppable coming darkness."

Books: Anarchism In Its Many Flavors

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Insurrectionary anarchists believed that capitalism would be overthrown by a spontaneous violent revolt by the workers. During that revolt, the workers would reorganize work along egalitarian lines and create a utopian society.

Books: A New Classic of Northwest Logging and Radicalism

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If Norwegians and Swedes laid down the legends of the Puget Sound country, Finns were their counterparts in southwest Washington and northwest Oregon in lands drained by the mighty Columbia.

BOOKS: The Donald as Il Duce

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Mussolini’s career ended badly, his desecrated body hung from a rafter by some of the same people who had cheered at his rallies. But while he lived, he built a cult of personality that foreshadowed that of Donald Trump.

Confessions of a Badass Reporter

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In a rollicking new memoir titled Fearless: Confessions of a Badass Reporter, Blacklow chronicles her adventures at a time when few females did the job she did.

REVIEW: “Seattle’s Medic One: How We Don’t Die”

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Before Medic One, Seattle firefighters had responded to thousands of medical emergencies. But residents needed a faster and more effective life-saving service regardless of their location or ability to pay, and there needed to be an equitable way to cover the costs of this new service.

A Tribute to Gordon Walker, Pied Piper of Northwest Architecture

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Walker got caught up in the mystique of the legendary Northwest style, also called “stick modern” because of expressed wood structures. He came to Seattle and moved easily among the architects who were putting the city on the map in the 1960s.

Why the saga of Chief Joseph still haunts our region

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I recently finished Daniel Sharfstein’s magisterial 2017 work, Thunder in the Mountains: Chief Joseph, Oliver Otis Howard and the Nez Perce War. Sharfstein, a...