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Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Dick Lilly

Dick Lilly is a former journalist whose career began with alternative weeklies and took him on to the Seattle Times where he spent 15 years coverning local government from City Hall to the school board. HIs career continued at Seattle Public Utilities as a public information officer and policy analyst working on waste prevention.

The Glaring Gap In Reading Skills In Seattle Schools: Systemic Racism Writ Large

Basically, in 50 years, we’ve gotten nowhere. Here’s the 2017-18 data for Seattle: students proficient in reading at grade level, 3rd grade, whites 80 percent; blacks 35.5 percent. That’s what systemic racism looks like.

Jenny Durkan’s Terrible, Horrible, No-Good,Very Bad Week

Durkan heard this clamor from the streets, the public, and perhaps her own advisors. A week earlier she banned tear gas for 30 days. Nevertheless, that was far from enough to take control of the issue, to stand her up as a leader.

Let’s Insure Employment, not Unemployment

Changing "unemployment" insurance to employment insurance, paying to keep workers on the job can soften the impact of the coming recession.

This Year’s Clinton Emails Slur – Joe Biden’s Son

In the impeachment games, Trump got off and Biden got smeared. Get ready for Emails 2.0.

After Day One: Failure To Move The Needle

While everybody here is pretty much on the mark for the way they and people in the liberal bubble saw and reacted to the marvelous calm ...

A Better (And Fairer) Way To Fund Medicare For All.

What employers now pay for their workers’ health insurance should be paid NOT to the government but to the workers as a raise – both the portion already taken out of employee paychecks and the company’s share.

District 3: Sawant is Key to the City Council’s Future

Let’s suppose Sandeep Kaushik’s analysis is pretty close to predictive. It’s not cause for optimism among those who’d like to see the city council move even a little bit toward the center.

Political centrism: Smug, weak and misguided

The political center isn't always where you want to end up. Pundits filling print or online op-ed pages or pontificating on cable news think they’re pretty smart because, unlike elected officials, they have the wisdom to see and urge on us the middle way: compromise and all our problems are solved. Until 1980 or so, that was a workable way to look at governing.

Latest Post Alley Posts

Seattle City Council Finally Crafts a ‘Boss-Tax’ That Can Survive

One positive step was the emergence of Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, who happens to be the current budget chair and who knows how to consult with business for their views and to get other councilmembers on board.

Statuary Offenses

It is true that when we take them down, all those people whose sole method of learning history is walking past statues of “great” men, looking up and then looking down again if there’s enough time on the tour schedule to read an inscription, will have to find another way of learning history.

Crowdsourcing the Name of a New Duwamish River Park (But First, Some Context)

The whuljootseed word, TSEETS-kah-deeb, “clitoris,” names a little promontory just across on the river’s east bank that refers to a myth in which Mink, a frantically lascivious bumbler, asks his grandmother if he can use her clitoris for bait. There it is! We have the green beach grub on one side of the river and grandmother’s tumescent clitoris on the other.

Seattle Faces A Budget Reckoning. Here’s What We Learned Last Time.

We bargained with the unions, getting concessions like unpaid furloughs so that we could reduce the number of layoffs. We closed libraries for a week in August. We cut community center hours and reduced park maintenance.

How Camden, N.J. (Of All Places) Transformed Its Police Force

The existing police department was dis-banded. In time, 45% of the officers were re-hired, but for a new kind of job. One that Thomson said will be more like being in “the Peace Corps” than in “Special Forces.”