Dick Lilly

Dick Lilly is a former Seattle Times reporter who covered local government from the neighborhoods to City Hall and Seattle Public Schools. He later served as a public information officer and planner for Seattle Public Utilities, with a stint in the mayor’s office as press secretary for Mayor Paul Schell. He has written on politics for Crosscut.com and the Seattle Times as well as Post Alley.

Eric Redman’s New Mystery Explores Fault-Lines of Hawaiian Identity

“Bones of Hilo” brings out the personal and group conflicts arising between the preservation of Hawaiian culture and the overwhelming forces of development and tourism.

A Plan to Help Low-Income Renters

This legislative session could have a silver lining for renters and advocates for affordable housing in a tax break offered to landlords who will freeze rents for six years.

Guardrails Down, What to do With Trump’s Militia Legacies?

It is the status-threatened, outsider and alienated groups where Trump likely has left us with unusually lasting damage. Trump brought them into politics, a place they hadn’t – at least in an organized way – been before. He gave them a role.

How to Save Downtown Seattle? A Tax Deal for Streetside Retail

Property tax exemptions designed to lower rents for street-level businesses may be just what’s needed to resuscitate stores and restaurants gasping from Covid 19 restrictions and restore vitality to downtown and neighborhood business areas.

Why the Polls were Wrong: We’re Exhausted by Change

Trump stressed the fear of change from the Democrats and the street protests. But that cut two ways, since he was a hugely disruptive force himself.

Mike Pence: Standard Bearer for A Tattered Party

Pence pushed hard with claims about what good things Trump supposedly has done. He lost that point on the trade war when Kamala Harris hit him with job losses and the impact on farmer incomes.

Raging and Interrupting

So Biden looks like he reaches the people and Trump at best is sending messages only to his base.

Distance Learning Will Increase Inequity in Schools. Here’s How to Fix It

The potential for inequity, for continuing the systemic racism already – and for decades – built into public schools (all schooling, really), is staggering.

Chapters 47 & 48, Epilogue: Picnic, and Auto-Pilot

Chapter 47 Picnic Friday July 4, 10 a.m.               Falconer, Danny and Theresa drove to the Fauntleroy ferry terminal early to make sure they caught a boat to Vashon before 10:30,...

Chapters 43, 44, 45 & 46: Match, Town Car, Kidnapped, and Pizza

Not the phone this time. This was the real deal. No denials left. Falconer wanted to meet the governor away from her office, which he figured would be buzzing with curious and potentially indiscreet staffers and thoroughly wired to send every pin drop to a hard drive somewhere. He drove a couple hours over the pass to Yakima where she was attending a conference on irrigation and water rights. When she came out of the hotel, Falconer was standing by her car shooting the shit with the trooper behind the wheel. “Walk with me a bit?”

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