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Saturday, October 24, 2020

Ross Anderson

Ross Anderson is a founding member of the Rainshadow Journal collective. He retired to Port Townsend after 30 years of journalism at the Seattle Times.

The Olympic Peninsula’s Hidden State Park Gem that’s Largely Unused

Eventually, this gem on Discovery Bay is destined to be discovered. Miller is at the top of the state’s list for development. More than a decade ago, State Parks convened public meetings to discuss longterm plans with hopes of opening as early as 2013. But those plans got pushed to a back burner with the recession, and Covid economics are likely to keep it there indefinitely.

Senior City: Port Townsend’s Boomer Invasion

For decades, Seattle boomers have been tripping off to Port Townsend for weekends of beach walks, wooden...

COVID Casualties: Another Northwest Institution Says Goodbye

Experienced woodworkers might put it all together in a couple of weeks, but amateurs spend months, working weekends and calling Pygmy now and then for advice. And no doubt many of those kits remain boxed or partially constructed, stowed in the garage rafters.

Real Police Reform? Begin With Who’s Recruited

To break through the police “blue curtain,” departments should start by raising the minimum age which, in Seattle and most departments, is just 21.

When Port Townsend Needed A General Store

Community-owned stores are more familiar in small Midwest towns, most of which sell groceries in what are sometimes called “food deserts,” rural areas that can’t support a supermarket. But mercantile stores are another matter.

Why Does The Seattle Times Win So Many Pulitzers?

Like newspapers everywhere, the Times has been decimated by plummeting circulation and ad revenue, by repeated layoffs and slashed budgets. The stately art deco office building and modern printing plant are long gone. But the paper continues to pursue gutsy journalism and national prizes.

Extreme Distancing: A One-Man Island

As the sole resident of Protection Island, the two-mile long bird refuge at the entrance to Discovery Bay, west of Port Townsend, Marty Bluewater has to be one of the best-distanced souls in Puget Sound country.

Extinction Event? Local Newspapers and Weeklies may not Survive the Virus

As small newspapers disappear, the impacts are largely cultural and intangible. The good ones tell readers what their local town council is up to, who’s running for mayor, or what caused that car crash on the highway through town.

Latest Post Alley Posts

Yes, I Speak Car Repair: My R2-D2 Strut Bracings Are Shot?

The trick is to run out the clock by asking a lot of seemingly-dumb questions until, exhausted, the scammers are ready for a low-ball offer.

Three WA Congressional Races that Explain Current Washington Politics

The “Berniecrat” wing of the Democratic Party misfired this year with scattershot challengers to Reps. Kilmer and Rick Larsen, candidates who cheered on the Capitol Hill occupied zone in Seattle. Rep. Adam Smith, in the 9th District, blew away left opponents in 2016 and 2018. Running in the 10th, Beth Doglio is the most credible hope of the “blue-green” left of labor and environmental activists.

A Dog’s Take on The Lewis & Clark and on that Black Dog Depression

The book is narrated by Meriwether Lewis’ dog, Seaman, a Newfoundland. As such it is a great introduction to this important chapter in American history. And there really was a “Seaman.”

The Real Winner: Kristen Welker

The president came out second best to Biden, losing out on most issues with defensive responses ("it was China's fault"), looks-will-kill glares, frantic accordion hands, and obvious lies.

Goooooooal! (Not)

Biden talked of kids “torn from the arms” of parents; Trump went on about coyotes and cartels, murderers and rapists. Biden promised a “path to citizenship” for millions and preservation of DACA. It went downhill from there, Trump declared himself “the least racist person in the room” and appeared totally incoherent on climate change.