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Thursday, August 6, 2020

Ross Anderson

Ross Anderson is a founding member of the Rainshadow Journal collective. He retired to Port Townsend after 30 years of journalism at the Seattle Times.

Senior City: Port Townsend’s Boomer Invasion

For decades, Seattle boomers have been tripping off to Port Townsend for weekends of beach walks, wooden...

COVID Casualties: Another Northwest Institution Says Goodbye

Experienced woodworkers might put it all together in a couple of weeks, but amateurs spend months, working weekends and calling Pygmy now and then for advice. And no doubt many of those kits remain boxed or partially constructed, stowed in the garage rafters.

Real Police Reform? Begin With Who’s Recruited

To break through the police “blue curtain,” departments should start by raising the minimum age which, in Seattle and most departments, is just 21.

When Port Townsend Needed A General Store

Community-owned stores are more familiar in small Midwest towns, most of which sell groceries in what are sometimes called “food deserts,” rural areas that can’t support a supermarket. But mercantile stores are another matter.

Why Does The Seattle Times Win So Many Pulitzers?

Like newspapers everywhere, the Times has been decimated by plummeting circulation and ad revenue, by repeated layoffs and slashed budgets. The stately art deco office building and modern printing plant are long gone. But the paper continues to pursue gutsy journalism and national prizes.

Extreme Distancing: A One-Man Island

As the sole resident of Protection Island, the two-mile long bird refuge at the entrance to Discovery Bay, west of Port Townsend, Marty Bluewater has to be one of the best-distanced souls in Puget Sound country.

Extinction Event? Local Newspapers and Weeklies may not Survive the Virus

As small newspapers disappear, the impacts are largely cultural and intangible. The good ones tell readers what their local town council is up to, who’s running for mayor, or what caused that car crash on the highway through town.

Latest Post Alley Posts

Tuesday’s Primaries: The Berniecrats Go Down

The Asteroid issue failed to take off for one “Berniecrat” challenging a down-to-earth Washington congressman, as insurgencies from the left continued to fizzle in races for Congress.

The Virtual Meeting: What Works, What Doesn’t

Because life is not “normal,” we don’t have to do what we’ve always done. The quarantine is an opportunity to have more intentional social gatherings, which can only enhance our interactions, regardless if they take place virtually or in-person.

Chapters 20 &21: Café Campagna, and Viewpoint

“He wasn’t there. Hadn’t shown up and that surprised them all. I sat next to a woman, Rosalyn something or other, from his office, receptionist-administrative assistant, majordomo, sounds like. Going to these fundraisers and rubbing shoulders with political types at the boss’s expense seems to be a perk of the job at Carl Barclay Associates. Rosalyn said she’d talked to him before lunch and he was planning to be there.”

News or Views? Does anyone trust the media?

We want to trust the news media, but a new study finds we often don't.

Reading Signs Of Climate Change In The Pacific Northwest

The Quinault Nation is “geographically classified now as living below sea level” as stated in testimony to Congress by President Fawn Sharp . The tribe’s forced relocation due to rising sea level is eerily parallel with the legend of the Flood Tide Woman, who lead the First Nations Haida people to higher, safer ground.