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Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Eileen V. Quigley

Eileen V. Quigley is the Executive Director of the Clean Energy Transition Institute, which advances strategies to achieve deep decarbonization and accelerate the transition from fossil fuel to clean energy. Eileen’s career includes eight years as a journalist in Washington, DC and New York City, covering politics and business; 10 years in the high-tech industry in Seattle; and 14 years as a nonprofit manager. She is a part-time Instructor at Western Washington University’s Institute for Energy Studies, where she co-teaches a winter quarter course on transitioning the Northwest energy systems to clean energy, and the author of several papers on clean energy solutions. Eileen received her Master of Science in Journalism from Columbia University and her Bachelor of Arts in Literature from Yale University.

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